What Is Duration?

This section introduces duration between two events. The standard unit of duration is called 'second', which is the duration of 9,192,631,770 periods of the radiation corresponding to the transition between the two hyperfine levels of the ground state of the caesium 133 atom.

What Is Duration? Duration is a measurement we use to describe how much time is there between two events.

In order to measure duration, we have to define a standard unit. Currently (as of 1967), the standard unit to measure duration is called "second" defined by CIPM (International Committee for Weights and Measures) as: "the duration of 9,192,631,770 periods of the radiation corresponding to the transition between the two hyperfine levels of the ground state of the caesium 133 atom".

This definition sounds very precise. But it is based on the following assumption:

Before using radiation periods of an atom, the solar system was used to define "second" in 1956 as: "the fraction 1/31,556,925.9747 of the tropical year for 1900 January 0 at 12 hours ephemeris time".

The standard unit defined, we can create clocks and timers to measure durations between two events as shown in the picture below:

Time - Using Clock to Measure Duration (Stephanie Deveau)
Using Clock to Measure Duration

Last update: 2014.

Table of Contents

 About This Book

 Introduction of Space

 Introducion of Frame of Reference

Introducion of Time

 What Is Time?

What Is Duration?

 Second Prefixes and Other Units

 List of Various Durations

 Introduction of Speed

 Newton's Laws of Motion

 Introduction of Special Relativity

 Time Dilation in Special Relativity

 Length Contraction in Special Relativity

 The Relativity of Simultaneity

 Introduction of Spacetime

 Minkowski Spacetime and Diagrams

 References

 PDF Printing Version