Java Secure Socket Extension (JSSE)

This section describes the Java Secure Socket Extension (JSSE) that allows you to write Java programs to communicate with HTTPS Web servers.

If you want to write your own Java program to communicate with an HTTPS Web server, you should use the Java Secure Socket Extension (JSSE) to help you.

The Java Secure Socket Extension (JSSE) enables secure Internet communications. It provides a framework and an implementation for a Java version of the SSL and TLS protocols and includes functionality for data encryption, server authentication, message integrity, and optional client authentication. Using JSSE, developers can provide for the secure passage of data between a client and a server running any application protocol, such as Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP), Telnet, or FTP, over TCP/IP.

JSSE includes the following important features:

Last update: 2011.

Table of Contents

 About This Book

 Introduction of PKI (Public Key Infrastructure)

 Introduction of HTTPS (Hypertext Transfer Protocol Secure)

 Using HTTPS with IE (Internet Explorer) 10

 Using HTTPS with Chrome 40

 Using HTTPS with Firefox 35

 Perl Scripts Communicating with HTTPS Servers

 PHP Scripts Communicating with HTTPS Servers

Java Programs Communicating with HTTPS Servers

Java Secure Socket Extension (JSSE)

 Using openStream() Method in java.net.URL Class

 javax.net.ssl.trustStore System Property

 Default Trusted KeyStore File - cacerts

 PKIX Path Building Failed - No CA Certificate

 Using openConnection() Method in java.net.URL Class

 Certificate Stores and Certificate Console

 .NET Programs Communicating with HTTPS Servers

 CAcert.org - Root CA Offering Free Certificates

 PKI CA Administration - Issuing Certificates

 Digital Signature - Microsoft Word 2007

 Digital Signature - OpenOffice.org 3

 S/MIME and Email Security

 PKI (Public Key Infrastructure) Terminology

 Outdated Tutorials

 References

 PDF Printing Version